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AgriPartner Scouting Update 7/1/14

Many corn fields in Michiana suffered damage from Monday night’s severe winds.  

The taller the corn, the more susceptible it was to green-snap – where the stalk actually breaks into two pieces.  Plants breaking below the ear leaf will not recover.  

If the break was above the ear leaf, the plant will survive and produce an ear, just not a high yielding one.

Shorter corn and fields where the soil was still fairly saturated resulted in the corn lodging, or just falling over.  

In a few instances the plant uprooted.

Survival and recovery from lodging depends on the growth stage of the corn and if growing conditions remain favorable in the initial days and weeks after the damage, allowing the plant to regenerate its root system.  Generally, younger corn has a higher recovery rate than older corn.  Surprisingly, most of the corn should straighten up, although some will have a curved stalk near the base, referred as “goose-neck”.  Goose-neck in and of itself is not bad per se, it just reflects the stress the plant has suffered and is sometimes more difficult to harvest in the fall.  

The wet conditions have been ideal for disease pressure and blights have been showing up in corn fields.  

Fungicide treatments will prevent diseases from spreading, they do not cure the disease.  Most diseases start on the lower leaves and move up the plant.  In corn it is advisable to protect the ear leaf (and then the ear) from disease.  Applications of fungicides are recommended at VT- when the tassel emerges.  Plan ahead if you wish to apply fungicides, as this is right around the corner.  In most cases, the application must be done through the irrigation or by aerial applicators.

Twisted Whorl Syndrome in corn just looks so uncomfortable.

As plants continue to grow, they will break the tight outer leaf, revealing jagged edged leaves inside the whorl.  There is no real rhyme or reason to this happening and is seemingly harmless to the plants.  Just rather interesting.

Japanese Beetles are present in both corn and soybeans, feeding on leaf tissue.  In corn this pest is not a concern until silk clipping occurs.  In soybeans if defoliation reaches 20% during bloom and pod fill treatment may be justified.

Beans are beginning to bloom and many fields have started to canopy across the rows.  Disease is also being found in soybean fields, here is Septoria Brown Spot.

 

As always, thanks for scouting with us!  Hope you can walk straight and tall corn next week!

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