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AgriPartner Scouting Update 7/30/14

 To refresh your memory the Farmer’s Almanac predicted above average rainfall for June, average for July and below average for August.  June recorded just about an inch above normal rainfall.  July was actually short the normal 2.21 inches.  And now we head into August.  Let’s hope for timing rains!  We don’t need much, just a little bit at the right times!

In a bean field in southern Mishwaka this was spotted:

A lone Lady Beetle.  But this time of year, even one Lady Beetle is cause for closer inspection … and sure enough, this is what s/he was eating:

Soybean Aphids.  While numbers are currently below the threshold for spraying, these pests can explode in population in the right weather environment.  Soybean Aphids like hot, dry weather.  If temperatures heat up and it remains dry scout soybean fields every few days for this pest.  They can double their population in 24 hours!  It’s hard to count the number of aphids per plant … but try, the threshold is 250 aphids per plant.  A good rule of thumb is if the aphids are on the stem, then that plant has reached the threshold.   Inspect the entire field, counting aphids on 20-30 plants.  Ants are also attracted to aphids, they feed on the “honeydew” created by the aphids.

Soybeans at stage R4 (pod growth) are most susceptible to aphid damage … scout fields closely and often!

The effects of the wet spring are being felt … disease pressure has been found to be worse in areas that had standing water earlier in the season.  

Sudden Death Syndrome shows up with yellowing of soybean leaves in the upper and middle canopy.  Eventually these leaves will die and drop early.  The fungus that causes Sudden Death Syndrome overwinters in the soil, there is no treatment.

Insects continue to feed on soybean leaves as well … here a Bean Leaf Beetle has a feast.

 

Corn pollination is nearing completion in most fields.  If you happen across this fungus, Corn Smut, consider it your lucky day, considered a delicacy in many countries it is edible if you’re feeling adventurous!

 

As always, thanks for scouting with us!

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