Menu

Nozzle Selection Is Critical

As the spray season moves forward it’s important to continue to assess your sprayer and make sure you’re getting the best performance with the least amount of spray drift potential. Nozzle selection is an important part of that assessment. Consider your priorities before making nozzle choices.

Nozzles are relatively inexpensive but they can be the most important sprayer component you buy. When should you be concerned about spray drift? The following situations may require using low drift nozzles.

One setting may be when you are spraying highly active or nonselective herbicides. Another reason to consider a low-drift nozzle is when treating herbicide-resistant crops such as glysophate resistant soybeans or corn. You may want to use these nozzles when the spraying is done near a sensitive area such as shelterbelts, farmsteads, gardens and other settings.

They are also a good choice if you are trying to reduce environmental contamination and avoid future drift problems. Low-drift nozzles are designed to produce larger, more consistently sized spray droplets with fewer driftable fines. The bigger droplets are produced in a pressure-reducing chamber inside the nozzle and, with several nozzles, by incorporating air into the sprayer droplets. These nozzles are excellent at reducing, but not eliminating all drift.

Whatever your nozzle choice is, make sure you read and use all pesticides according to their label. If the product prohibits applications above a specific wind velocity, you are breaking the law and may be held liable for any damages caused by the misuse. Be aware that drift-reducing nozzles only reduce drift, not eliminate it.

A joint SDSU and NDSU Extension publication is available to help producers learn more about the nozzles that are available. It summarizes characteristics of low-drift nozzle technology and features photos of each nozzle and the spray patterns they produce. 

Source: iGrow

Recent News

Fall-applied Herbicides-What Goes Around Comes Around
9/22/2020

Fall herbicide treatments have fallen off over the past several years for a couple of reasons, among them the effectiveness of new soybean trait systems for managing marestail, some generally crappy weather in late fall, and efforts to reduce input costs.  We are seeing a resurgence in some weeds, such as dandelion, which respond well […]

New Round of Farm Aid for COVID Losses Announced, and Causes Snag in Congressional Spending Bill
9/22/2020

Andrew Restuccia and Jesse Newman reported in Friday’s Wall Street Journal that, “President Trump unveiled $13 billion in new aid to farmers facing economic harm from the coronavirus pandemic as he aimed to boost support among rural voters at a campaign rally. ‘I’m proud to announce that I’m doing even more to support Wisconsin farmers,’ said Mr. Trump, speaking outside […]

Corn Silage Needs Adequate Moisture to Ferment
9/18/2020

Early season frost is challenging for corn silage producers, according to Karl Hoppe, Extension livestock systems specialist at NDSU’s Carrington Research Extension Center. Frost makes an abrupt end to the corn-growing season. This begins the dry-down period for the corn plants. “Good corn silage fermentation requires adequate moisture to reduce dry-matter loss and spoilage,” Hoppe […]

Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now